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16Dec/11Off

Android 4.0.2 Update Rolling Out to GSM Galaxy Nexus

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A day after the LTE version of the Samsung Galaxy Nexus received its Android 4.0.2 update its GSM brethren is following suit. Users are reporting a 8.7MB update that brings the phones firmware build to ICL53F, which brings along “important bug fixes” that should hold serve with the tweaks delivered to the Verizon Galaxy Nexus.

Google has already announced Android 4.0.3, which is said to be headed to handsets in the coming weeks and will take over as the “base” version of Ice Cream Sandwich for all phones moving forward.

[via AndroidCentral]


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16Dec/11Off

PS Vita details surface on Trophies, remote play, and more

Sony’s PS Vita has already sold out in pre-orders for its December 17 launch in Japan, but it won’t be heading to the states until February 22. Nonetheless, we can indulge in new details on the device that have been revealed in the English version of the console’s user guide, which Sony has made available online. Main things to note are the way Trophies are earned on the PS Vita, how backups are saved, and the Remote Play feature.

Trophies for physical, retail PS Vita games can only be earned for a game on the system the game was started on. If you play the game on another PS Vita, you will not be able to earn Trophies unless you associate the game with your PSN account. This means that you would sign up for PSN when you start the game on one console and when you play it on another you would have to sign in to PSN first.

As for saving backups, if you have application/game data along with save data are on a Memory Card, then both can be backed up to a PS3 or a computer. But, if the game saves to a PS Vita game card, then neither types of data can be backed up.

When it comes to Remote Play, there are three different kinds of button assignments and image quality options of +1, Standard, and -1. Screenshots can also be taken by pressing the PS Button and Start button at the same time, although this may not be supported in all applications or all parts of an application.

And lastly, the manual detailed battery life estimates for the PS Vita, pegging 3-5 hours of game play when network features are off, about 5 hours of playing videos, and 9 hours for listening to music. Recharge time from empty to full will take about 2 hours and 40 minutes.

[via PlayStation Lifestyle]


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PS Vita details surface on Trophies, remote play, and more is written by Rue Liu & originally posted on SlashGear.
© 2005 - 2011, SlashGear. All right reserved.


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16Dec/11Off

Android 4.0.3 to bring bug fixes, optimizations, and new APIs

Google has announced via its developer blog an update to Android 4.0.3 that will bring optimizations and bug fixes along with new APIs. This update is also considered to be the base version that will be pushed by third parties on production phones and tablets in the weeks ahead.

The very first Android 4.0 Ice Cream Sandwich smartphone, the Galaxy Nexus, had just launched yesterday on Verizon. New owners of the device were immediately prompted for an update to version 4.0.2, which brought improved mobile hotspot functionality, optimized 3G/4G data connections and more.

Today’s update to version 4.0.3 brings more optimizations but also additional APIs that allow developers to tap into Contacts, Calendar, and camera capabilities such as video stabilization. Additionally, there are some improvements in graphics, database, spell-checking, Bluetooth, and more.

[via Android Developer Blog]


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Android 4.0.3 to bring bug fixes, optimizations, and new APIs is written by Rue Liu & originally posted on SlashGear.
© 2005 - 2011, SlashGear. All right reserved.


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16Dec/11Off

Pirates of game Witcher 2 charged $1,230 each for their efforts

This week it’s become clear that those users who have pirated the game Witcher 2 from game developer CD Projekt were not alone in receiving a $1,230 bill in damages for illegally downloading the game – thousands, apparently, of these pirates have been given the throw down signal. I should mention here that the alternate title for this post is “Game you never heard of is pirated, developers mad about it,” since it’s not the most likely event that you’ve played this game before, and it’s certainly not the first time that a developer group has grumbled about their games being stolen on a mass level. It is a significant event, on the other hand, because of the awesomely simple solution CD Projekt has initiated here: bill them!

This isn’t the most creative way to do away with pirates – not by a long shot – but it’s certain to wake more than a few of them up to the fact that they’re certainly not going unnoticed, and the chance that they will get caught taking what they didn’t pay for is certainly no non-existent. Torrentfreak is one of the websites that is claiming they’ve been contacted by these thousands of recipients of bills for €911.80 ($1230) as sent out by CD Projekt. They’re also saying, though, that the recipients aren’t always who CD Projekt assumes they are:

“Aside from targeting many people who indeed downloaded and shared the game without paying, CD Projekt’s lawyers are also wrongfully accusing people who have never even heard of the game.” – Torrentfreak

Back in 2008, as some of you may remember, UK based file-sharing lawyers Davenport Lyons sent out very similar cash settlement demands. This set of demands was instead for the original Witcher game. CD Project has affirmed, contrary to what Torrentfreak says, that they “only take legal actions against users who we are 100 per cent sure have downloaded our game illegally.” Sound alright to you?

[via Venture Beat]


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Pirates of game Witcher 2 charged $1,230 each for their efforts is written by Chris Burns & originally posted on SlashGear.
© 2005 - 2011, SlashGear. All right reserved.


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16Dec/11Off

AVATAR iTunes Extras Special Edition makes you want it all over again

There’s this movie out there called AVATAR, perhaps you’ve heard of it, that’s been what its creators have had no trouble saying is ground breaking innovations surrounding it since it was first previewed – and today it’s been announced that through its iTunes sales channel, the folks at Twentieth Century Fox will be bringing you a whole new interactive experience for the movie unique to the platform. You’ll be able to do things like use your mouse as a wand to see where the green-screen is behind the real actors, see the behind the scenes scenes with full menus, and deconstruct “some of the movie’s most memorable scenes.” This purchase will set you back $19.99 for the HD version or $14.99 for the SD version, and it all starts today (pre-orders, anyway.)

You’ll see everything this special edition has to offer in the video below: pay close attention to that Green Screen X-ray portion, that could lead to some big things in interactive movie entertainment if allowed to expand. For now though it seems like most of these special edition bits are limited to single “pivotal” scenes while the rest of the movie will be yours to continue thinking about on your own time. Deconstruction of scenes in simultaneous different-angled views.

You’ll also be getting the original screenplay as written by James Cameron, his scriptment of the movie – this being essentially a novella of some scenes complete with dialog, and one big gigantic gallery of 1,700 images. This release should be interesting to watch as Avatar is already the highest grossing film in history thus far and still holds the title for top-selling Blu-ray disk in history as well. Will you pick it up?


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AVATAR iTunes Extras Special Edition makes you want it all over again is written by Chris Burns & originally posted on SlashGear.
© 2005 - 2011, SlashGear. All right reserved.


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16Dec/11Off

Qualcomm Snapdragon Stadium in the works for temporary brand impact

This week its been revealed that Qualcomm will be temporarily re-naming the home of the San Diego Chargers to Snapdragon Stadium. This place where the football team does battle weekly has up until this week been named Qualcomm Stadium, this move done in order to make sure people know that the Snapdragon processor is on the rise, powering more than 300 smartphones and tablets worldwide and ready to make an impact on 2012. The re-naming of the stadium is a collaboration between the City of San Diego, the San Diego Chargers, and the San Diego Bowl Association.

This move is the “first in the area of stadium naming sponsorships” and will be capitalizing on a ten-day span of high-traffic days when the stadium will be playing host to three nationally televised football games for maximum Snapdragon exposure. On the 18th of December the San Diego Chargers will be matching up against the Baltimore Ravens, then on the 21st the San Diego County Credit Union Poinsettia Bowl will be taking place. On the 28th, the final big event of the three will be in the stadium, this the Bridgepoint Education Holiday Bowl. Dean Spanos, Chairman of the Board and President of the San Diego Chargers noted the following:

“This is a first-of-its-kind effort to completely rename a stadium without changing naming rights. We look forward to playing in Snapdragon Stadium and helping Qualcomm bring awareness to the technologies Snapdragon processors enable.” - Spanos

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This move will be a stadium transformation, made specifically to inform customers and future customers how Snapdragon processors allow them to do MORE on their mobile devices while maintaining a battery life at levels they’ll love. The combined three games will reach 30 million TV viewers and 150,000 fans in attendance they say, this working out well for Qualcomm in the whole audience connection arena. A full change in the stadium’s Qualcomm signage will take place, temporarily replaced with the flashy red of Snapdragon signs and banners, and devices will be given away in accordance with advertisements during and leading up to the game.


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Qualcomm Snapdragon Stadium in the works for temporary brand impact is written by Chris Burns & originally posted on SlashGear.
© 2005 - 2011, SlashGear. All right reserved.


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16Dec/11Off

SOPA and PROTECT IP rallied against by top-tier internet founders

When it comes to something so very important as the two proposed pieces of legislation PROTECT IP Act and Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA), you’d be surprised how little the vast majority of the people voting on whether or not they are passed into law know what their actions may do to the internet and the greater world at large – thats why when “An open letter to Washington” came across our desk, it came as no surprise. What this letter contains is a very brief and to the point set of paragraphs and bullet points rallying against the two acts in question, signed at the bottom by a set of internet-based business heads that would make Al Gore shake in his shoes. Everyone from founders of eBay to Google to the Internet Archive are listed here, and we’d suggest that the recipients of this letter lend an open ear.

What the signees of this letter suggest is that everyone who will vote upon these acts heed their words, they being people fortunate enough to have been able to freely found Internet companies and nonprofits “in a regulatory climate that promotes entrepreneurship, innovation, the creation of content and free expression online.” They note that although they recognize that the PROTECT IP Act and the Stop Online Piracy Act were both started as “well-meaning efforts to control piracy online,” they’ve now turned into legislation that will undermine the framework that makes the internet such a great place to start a business and express one’s self online.

Points this group of leaders have raised are as follows:

These two pieces of legislation threaten to:

• Require web services, like the ones we helped found, to monitor what users link to, or upload. This would have a chilling effect on innovation;

• Deny website owners the right to due process of law;

• Give the U.S. Government the power to censor the web using techniques similar to those used by China, Malaysia and Iran; and

• Undermine security online by changing the basic structure of the Internet.

The list below is everyone who has signed on to the letter you’ll see in the gallery below. They each “urge Congress to think hard before changing the regulation that underpins the Internet.” In that they do not want to se “the next generation of entrepreneurs and founders” to not have the same opportunities they had when they started out, they’d rather these acts were not passed. Have a look, Congress – you know what to do:

Marc Andreessen, co-founder of Netscape and Andreessen Horowitz
Mitchell Baker, co-founder of Mozilla Firefox
Sergey Brin, co-founder of Google
Jack Dorsey, co-founder of Twitter and Square
Caterina Fake, co-founder of Flickr and Hunch
David Filo, co-founder of Yahoo!
Reid Hoffman, co-founder of LinkedIn
Arianna Huffington, co-founder of The Huffington Post
Chad Hurley, co-founder of YouTube
Brewster Kahle, founder of the Internet Archive and co-founder of Alexa Internet
Elon Musk, co-founder of PayPal
Craig Newmark, founder of craigslist
Pierre Omidyar, founder of eBay
Biz Stone, co-founder of Obvious and Twitter
Jimmy Wales, founder of Wikipedia and the Wikimedia Foundation
Evan Williams, co-founder of Blogger and Twitter
Jerry Yang, co-founder of Yahoo!

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SOPA and PROTECT IP rallied against by top-tier internet founders is written by Chris Burns & originally posted on SlashGear.
© 2005 - 2011, SlashGear. All right reserved.


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16Dec/11Off

Android 4.0 ICS tablet interface discovered inside Galaxy Nexus

Back a few months ago there was a discovery made by an intrepid developer inside Android’s Honeycomb OS in which changing the LCD density to a smaller value than the tablet it was running on had revealed a smartphone interface for the otherwise tablet-sized OS – one day after the USA-based Galaxy Nexus has been revealed here in the USA and our pal Michael Crider from Android Community has discovered that essentially the same thing happens in reverse with Ice Cream Sandwich. What Android 4.0 Ice Cream Sandwich is meant to do for the Google mobile OS is create one single OS that works just as well for handsets as it does for tablets, but until now we’ve got less than an adequate look at what this means for larger screened devices. As Crider shows here, it’s a rather interesting experience that everyone should have.

On the other hand, heed his warning: what Crider’s done to achieve this result is to unlock and root his device first, then mess around in the guts. If you do this, you’ll likely break your brand new device less than a day after you first purchased it. Don’t do that unless you love pain. Let Crider do it and sit back and clap for his awesome ability to mess in guts.

Mostly what you’ll see here if the device is in this state is a Honeycomb unlock screen like you’ve seen in the past and some off-set screens that don’t end up working all that well. This is because though there are coded bits in this build of Ice Cream Sandwich that are capable of going tablet sized, but with this set of settings you’ll not have the experience Google intends. The first place we’ll see both interfaces working from one single build of Ice Cream Sandwich is likely the ASUS Padfone combination tablet / handset that’ll be coming sometime inside 2012.

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You may well see a quad-core NVIDIA Tegra 3 in there too, but shhh, that’s not important now. Have a look at the rest of Crider’s thoughts on this build hack and do NOT do this to your device unless you want to destroy that which you love so dearly. More on Android Community. Also stick around here on SlashGear for our full review of the Galaxy Nexus from Verizon, coming soon!


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Android 4.0 ICS tablet interface discovered inside Galaxy Nexus is written by Chris Burns & originally posted on SlashGear.
© 2005 - 2011, SlashGear. All right reserved.


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16Dec/11Off

Dear Readers: why do you still use Internet Explorer?

This week we’ve learned two very important facts regarding the most infamous web browser of all, Internet Explorer: first that Microsoft intends to auto-update all of their older versions for users to the newest IE version 9, and second that Google Chrome 15 is now the most popular web browser version in the world. Though when you add up all the users using ANY version of Internet Explorer, you find that it still dominates this planet by a long shot, it’s still rather interesting that any one browser has taken the lead over the ultra-dominant browser made so fantastically giant by its pre-installed status on Windows-toting machines worldwide. So what’s your excuse?

This isn’t a new question and certainly isn’t one I’ve not asked my own family when they used to use Windows-based machines, so I’d like to put it back out there today to see how we’re all feeling about the situation. In the time between when AOL was the dominant internet provider in my area up here in mid-Minnesota and now, there was a big period of time when Internet Explorer took over the earth because first, it was installed on your machine when you bought it, and two: because “Netscape” was much harder to remember than the perfectly simple “Internet Explorer.” The brand name is still easily the best one in the web browser market: what do you use to browse the web? The explorer of the internets, of course.

Then there’s Apple’s “Safari” which took a cue from Internet Explorer and comes with your Mac, this leading to SOME people using it, and Google’s Chrome which has shown itself to be amongst the most popular downloads of the last year — Google is beyond an amazing brand, and just like Apple, if you’ve got one piece of the puzzle, you’re inclined to want the rest. Firefox and Opera did an OK job of appealing to the crowds of nerds and gamers out there wanting a custom experience, but in times as recently as this past week, your humble narrator has witnessed hoards of people on places like Reddit and Google+ speaking down on both of these browsers saying they’ve fallen into disrepair. These same people wouldn’t touch Internet Explorer with a 10 foot pole.

Just to be clear: I ask this as both a web developer and a lover of Google Chrome, as it’s been nothing but perfect for use in my everyday life, and developing for Internet Explorer has and continues to be nothing but a pain in the neck whereas all other browsers essentially live by the same basic rules.

So I ask again: why do you and/or anyone you know still use Internet Explorer?


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Dear Readers: why do you still use Internet Explorer? is written by Chris Burns & originally posted on SlashGear.
© 2005 - 2011, SlashGear. All right reserved.


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16Dec/11Off

Verizon picks up Cox AWS spectrum for further LTE expansion

This month Verizon is picking up contracts left and right, with a $3.6 billion purchase of AWS spectrum at the start of December and a $315 million purchase of Cox Communications 20 MHz Advanced Wireless Services this week. Though this agreement does not include Cox’s 700 MHz spectrum licenses, Cox Wireless customer accounts or any other assets at all, Cox and Verizon Wireless will becoming agents that sell each other’s commercial and residential products and services through each of their own sales channels. This agreement is expected to join up with the $3.6 billion agreement from earlier this month which includes Bright House Networks, Time Warner Cable, and Comcast.

What we’re looking at here is a team up of epic proportions, ladies and gentlemen, with Verizon only getting bigger in the very near future and throughout 2012. Cox on the other hand has this past month announced that it would no longer sell its Cox Wireless service but would in fact continue to provide the same services it’s been providing to its wireless customers through March 30th, 2012. After that you’re out of luck! Or in the luck if Verizon rolls their dice right.

As Pat Esser, President of Cox Communications notes:

“These agreements provide Cox customers with key enablers to mobility, such as access to Verizon Wireless’ 4G LTE network and iconic wireless devices. We look forward to the many benefits this will bring to customers.” – Esser

The FCC has approved the advanced wireless spectrum sale by Cox and transfer to Verizon Wireless and will be under review by the Hart-Scott Rodino Act and other customary conditions soon. What do you think, Cox, you ready for a high five of Verizon proportions?


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Verizon picks up Cox AWS spectrum for further LTE expansion is written by Chris Burns & originally posted on SlashGear.
© 2005 - 2011, SlashGear. All right reserved.


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