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13Nov/12Off

Build a photo calendar with Automator

You've seen it in your Launchpad. You've seen it in your Applications folder. It's Automator. It sounds cool. It looks cool. It's got a cool robot icon. But, what can it really do, and why should you care about it?

Well, Automator can do lots of things to improve and streamline your OS X experience. With Automator, you use building blocks called actions like ingredients in a recipe. When your actions are strung together, the result is an Automator workflow that can perform a series of tasks.

Apple provides lots of built-in actions for automating things with Calendar, Mail, Safari, and more. You get even more actions as you install Automator-ready apps, like Aperture, BBEdit, Microsoft Office, and Transmit.

What you can do with Automator depends on the actions installed on your Mac. So, you may run into limitations if you don't have actions for certain tasks, or if an app doesn't support Automator. For simple things like working with folders, images, and PDFs, however, it's a great tool that can save you time and let you do some fun stuff.

In this post, I'll show you how to use Automator to create a print plugin that shows up in the PDF menu when you print a document. This specific plugin lets you print a photo calendar right out of the Calendar app.

Continue reading Build a photo calendar with Automator

TUAW - The Unofficial Apple WeblogBuild a photo calendar with Automator originally appeared on TUAW - The Unofficial Apple Weblog on Tue, 13 Nov 2012 09:00:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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10Nov/12Off

Apple and HTC settle patent disputes, sign 10-year cross-licensing deal

The battle has been hot and heavy since March 2010, but the legal swords have apparently been beaten into touch-sensitive plowshares and Retina pruning-hooks. On Saturday, Apple and HTC announced that both companies have reached a settlement agreement to cover all outstanding lawsuits. The agreement also includes a decade-long patent licensing deal to cover current and future patents.

The terms of the deal are confidential, but The Verge quotes an HTC spokesperson saying that the settlement will not have "an adverse material effect" on the Taiwan-based manufacturer's financial results.

[hat tip Engadget]

TUAW - The Unofficial Apple WeblogApple and HTC settle patent disputes, sign 10-year cross-licensing deal originally appeared on TUAW - The Unofficial Apple Weblog on Sat, 10 Nov 2012 23:10:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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9Nov/12Off

Innovative Education in China with Mac

In a country where education has emphasized test taking and memorization, RDFZ XISHAN, an experimental middle school in Beijing, is the first school in China to participate in a Mac one-to-one program, which provides each student with a MacBook Pro. The program has transformed learning at the school into a collaborative and engaging experience — without sacrificing test scores. Says school principal Shu Dajun: “It’s no longer simply the teacher teaching and students studying. Everyone is equal in the creating and sharing of knowledge.”

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9Nov/12Off

NFL Playbooks: There’s an App for That

Katie Linendoll of ESPN.com reports that across the NFL teams “are trading in their 500-page printed playbooks for iPad.” Linendoll notes that iPad and an app called PlayerLync have revolutionized how the Denver Broncos, Green Bay Packers, Chicago Bears, Cincinnati Bengals, and San Diego Chargers share plays and distribute practice and game film among coaches and players. “It changes the way you prepare,” says Broncos tight end Jacob Tamme. “You can come off the practice field, get in the cold tub and watch film in the cold tub on your iPad.”

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8Nov/12Off

Made For iPhone manufacturers may have to comply with Apple’s supplier responsibility code

There's no gaggle of satellite trucks or eager liveblogs documenting every moment, but one of the most important Apple-related events is going on right now in Shenzhen, China: the annual MFi (Made For iPhone/iPad/iPod) manufacturers' conference. This multi-day meeting is the interface, so to speak, between Apple's mobile products and the vast ecosystem of accessories, gadgets and peripherals that swarms around them.

Only MFi-licensed vendors can use the "Made for iPhone" logo on their packaging, and they are the only ones who get access to Apple's internal documentation for interfaces and connectivity. With the advent of the Lightning connector across the iOS product line, this year's conference is a key opportunity for vendors to get the intelligence they need for 2013 and beyond. In fact, reports last month revealed that Apple intends to control the supply of Lightning connector pins directly, rather than allowing third parties to make the parts themselves.

The cone of silence surrounding the MFi meeting is intense, unlike the rather leaky WWDC experience. That's understandable: there's way fewer MFi companies than iOS/OS X developers, and the technical information under discussion at the MFi conference could provide Apple competitors with valuable intel.

Nevertheless, during the meeting this week a few interesting tidbits have made their way to us through the Great Firewall. Most are trivial (did not know: the Lightning connector is waterproof!) but one big one is not. According to our source at the event, Apple intends to make compliance with its supplier code of conduct a condition of MFi licensing.

The supplier code, which has been implemented and expanded over the past few years as Apple and manufacturing partner Foxconn have come under increasing scrutiny for working conditions, currently applies only to Apple's manufacturing supply chain partners and component vendors. Pushing it out to the larger accessory ecosystem would be a concrete example of Apple using its 800-pound-gorilla status in the consumer electronics space to influence more companies to behave ethically on worker rights, environmental issues and more.

Of course, there may well be MFi participants who see this move as heavy-handed and unnecessary. It's not yet clear what the schedule, audit requirements or penalties for non-compliance might be -- but there may be some vendors at the margins who feel that the additional effort and expense to comply decreases the overall value of participating in the iOS accessory market.

Even if you don't believe the DigiTimes rumor that Foxconn is considering building out LCD TV manufacturing plants in the US (and we don't), accessory makers which have US-based operations may have a leg up on compliance over those in China and elsewhere. We'll keep an eye out for official word of these policy changes in MFi over the next few weeks.

TUAW - The Unofficial Apple WeblogMade For iPhone manufacturers may have to comply with Apple's supplier responsibility code originally appeared on TUAW - The Unofficial Apple Weblog on Thu, 08 Nov 2012 12:33:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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5Nov/12Off

Apple Sells Three Million iPads in Three Days

Apple today announced it has sold three million iPads in just three days since the launch of its new iPad mini and fourth-generation
iPad — double the previous first weekend milestone of 1.5 million Wi-Fi-only third-generation iPad models. The Wi-Fi + Cellular versions of both iPad mini and fourth-generation iPad will ship in a few weeks in the U.S. and in many more countries later this year.

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2Nov/12Off

iPad mini launch day roundup

Given the transportation and logistical circumstances here in NYC post-Sandy, I'm not able to be at the 5th Avenue store for this morning's iPad mini intro. Since I can't give you first-hand reports, here's a roundup of the buying experience from those in the midst of it.

(Apple is running private shuttles for employees to make it in to work at 5th Ave, per BI. Two of Apple's five retail locations in Manhattan are in the powerless zone below midtown and are presumably closed; so are the independent Digital Society, Mike's Tech Shop and Tekserve stores, although Tekserve CEO Aaron Freimark emailed this morning to say that his store is open -- no power, but doing customer transactions via Square, and expecting a full shipment of new iPads and minis today.)

Bloomberg TV editor Jake Beckman sums up the NYC prioritization split quite well:

People are lined up for the iPad Mini this morning. Also lined up for gas. Oh, #NYC.

- Jake Beckman (@jakebeckman) November 2, 2012

Fortune's Philip Elmer-DeWitt, a consistent presence at the 5th Ave store for launches, reports about 550 people in line there this morning (and several camera crews). He suspects many of this morning's shoppers are planning to contribute their purchases to the overseas gray market. Fortune also has a collection of line videos from the launches in the Far East earlier today.

CNET's Shara Tibken reports in her liveblog that sales of the iPad mini & 4th-gen at 5th Ave have been pushed back to 10 am from the expected 8 am start.

TechCrunch's survey of opening day crowds indicates modest lines in most locations.

From the Pioneer Press/TwinCities.com, Julio Ojeda-Zapata posts a brief video of the modest turnout ("three dozen in line") at the massive Mall of America in Minnesota:

Not a big turnout for the iPad mini with just under three dozen in line at MOA but Apple does the usual clap 'n' greet: post.ly/9hgrT

- Julio Ojeda-Zapata (@ojezap) November 2, 2012

GearLive's Andru Edwards posts his line picture from Lynwood, WA:

iPad mini line - Taylor's idea to wait in line! (with Taylor and Eric at @officialapple) [pic] - path.com/p/qcdRv

-Andru Edwards (@AndruEdwards) November 2, 2012

Lines in Seattle appear modest, per @oakie -- although they've tripled since this earlier tweet:

@tuaw @cultofmac @macrumors @verge @engadget the line for #iPadmini at @uvillage #Apple Store in Seattle. all 4 of us.campl.us/mEzL

- oakie (@notoakie) November 2, 2012

iPad mini launch day

ifoAppleStore's Gary Allen is surveying the globe and notes a line in Amsterdam:

There was a waiting line at the Amsterdam (Netherlands) Apple store Friday morning for...iPad mini, iPhone 5? - flic.kr/p/dpW8GE

- Gary Allen (@ifostore) November 2, 2012

And another one here in Paris, where gray market shoppers may also be among those filling the queue:

Oh, thank goodness! An Apple retail store line, for the iPad mini at the Opéra (Paris) store. - bit.ly/SvjmIl

- Gary Allen (@ifostore) November 2, 2012

London's Covent Garden store, apparently, was not as well attended this morning:

The masses line up for iPad mini... Oh wait! Staff surprised as I was that no one turned up at covent garden twitter.com/mmalex/status/...

- mmalex (@mmalex) November 2, 2012

FirstPost reports a modest line in Sydney, Australia earlier today. Reuters relays Gene Munster's suggestion that some mini demand may be waiting for the release of the cellular-enabled models in a few weeks. The Register reports similarly muted retail crowding in Glasgow.

MacKozer sends in a picture from Poland:

@tuaw iPad mini spotted at Polish APR iSpot. Greetings from Poland and Polish bloggers ;) twitter.com/mackozer/statu...

- mackozer (@mackozer) November 2, 2012

Marcel & Oliver confirm short lines -- but also short supplies -- in Germany:

@davidcaolo can confirm that here in Germany. But supplies seem really limited. After just 1 hour all white base modells where gone.

- Marcel Marquis (@marcelmarquis) November 2, 2012

@tuaw I bought one in Germany, but there was no line. #iPadmini

- Oliver Stör (@ollistoer) November 2, 2012

Robbie queued up in Cardiff for his iPad:

It's 7AM and I'm Queuing for my iPad mini! instagr.am/p/RhKRZqF9MI/ @tuaw

- Robbie Bone (@RobbieBone) November 2, 2012

Chris has a short line ahead of him in Scottsdale, AZ:

@tuaw In line at the Scottsdale Quarter Apple Store for iPad mini. Only about 5 or 6 people ahead of me! twitter.com/knight_cjg/sta...

- Chris (@knight_cjg) November 2, 2012

Shawn picked up his iPad in Target with no wait at all:

@tuaw strolled into @target after 8am to pick up an iPad Mini.Nobody was even there and it wasn't even on the shelf. twitter.com/ctgm/status/26...

- Shawn caseitup.com (@ctgm) November 2, 2012

Chicago's lines seem longer, per Matthew's observation:

The iPad Mini has arrived. Lines wrapping around the block on Michigan Avenue. #Chicago twitter.com/MatthewSchwerh...

- Matthew Schwerha (@MatthewSchwerha) November 2, 2012

More reports and pictures from around the globe:

"@tuaw: If you're in line for an iPad mini or 4th gen today, send us a picture! #iPadmini"Line in Stockholm, Sweden twitter.com/mfr80/status/2...

- Michal Frankowski (@mfr80) November 2, 2012

@tuaw the "line" at the Santa Barbara, CA Apple Store. Minus myself of course; I was out of frame taking the picture! twitter.com/dburr/status/2...

- Donald Burr of Borg (@dburr) November 2, 2012

@tuaw got it already instagr.am/p/RhSbt1n_pd/

- Sascha (@saschaeggi) November 2, 2012

If you are on the fence about heading out for an iPad mini, perhaps this bit of advice from Discover's Ed Yong will help you make up your mind:

Screw the iPad mini. I'm just going to hold my iPad slightly further away.

- Ed Yong(@edyong209) November 2, 2012

TUAW - The Unofficial Apple WeblogiPad mini launch day roundup originally appeared on TUAW - The Unofficial Apple Weblog on Fri, 02 Nov 2012 08:01:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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31Oct/12Off

You can now use iTunes to support Hurricane Sandy relief

Apple and the American Red Cross are making it easy for you to donate towards relief efforts in the wake of the this week's devastating Hurricane Sandy. Simply by clicking on the American Red Cross tile that now appears on the main iTunes Store screen in iTunes, you can pledge from US$5 to $200 using your Apple ID on the dedicated donation screen that's been set up.

This isn't the first time Apple has teamed up with the American Red Cross to enable charitable donations via iTunes. The two have partnered up for other major disasters including the tsunami that struck Japan in 2011 and the massive Haitian earthquake of 2010.

Amazon has also added a Red Cross donation link to its homepage. Of course, you can donate directly via the Red Cross website.

[via 9to5Mac]

TUAW - The Unofficial Apple WeblogYou can now use iTunes to support Hurricane Sandy relief originally appeared on TUAW - The Unofficial Apple Weblog on Wed, 31 Oct 2012 21:30:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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31Oct/12Off

iPad mini reviews roundup (updated)

The rest of us will have to wait until Friday, but a few lucky reviewers have already gotten their hands on the iPad mini to give it a test run. Here's what journalists and tech bloggers have to say about the svelte mini:

Jim Dalrymple at The Loop:

I was wrong. I have wondered publicly whether or not a smaller tablet would fit into my workflow and even suggested the larger iPad would be better. I was wrong...

I went to a local big box retailer and used every tablet they had in the store, including Microsoft's new Surface. The difference was immediately clear. The quality of these other tablets is so inferior to what Apple manufactures that they felt like plastic toys in your hands...

I am a firm believer in "you get what you pay for." The iPad mini is a perfect example of that. If you want to save $50 and buy a cheap-ass tablet, go ahead. If you want quality the iPad mini will be waiting for you when you come to your senses.

Tim Stevens for Engadget:

This isn't just an Apple tablet made to a budget. This isn't just a shrunken-down iPad. This is, in many ways, Apple's best tablet yet, an incredibly thin, remarkably light, obviously well-constructed device that offers phenomenal battery life. No, the performance doesn't match Apple's latest and yes, that display is a little lacking in resolution, but nothing else here will leave you wanting. At $329, this has a lot to offer over even Apple's more expensive tablets.

Joshua Topolsky for The Verge:

The iPad mini is an excellent tablet - but it's not a very cheap one. Whether that's by design, or due to market forces beyond Apple's control, I can't say for sure. I can't think of another company that cares as much about how its products are designed and built - or one that knows how to maximize a supply chain as skillfully - so something tells me it's no accident that this tablet isn't selling for $200. It doesn't feel like Apple is racing to some lowest-price bottom - rather it seems to be trying to raise the floor.

...And it does raise the floor here. There's no tablet in this size range that's as beautifully constructed, works as flawlessly, or has such an incredible software selection. Would I prefer a higher-res display? Certainly. Would I trade it for the app selection or hardware design? For the consistency and smoothness of its software, or reliability of its battery? Absolutely not. And as someone who's been living with (and loving) Google's Nexus 7 tablet for a few months, I don't say that lightly.

David Pogue for The New York Times:

Over all, the mini gives you all the iPad goodness in a more manageable size, and it's awesome. You could argue that the iPad mini is what the iPad always wanted to be.

MG Siegler of TechCrunch:

The iPad mini isn't perfect - for one reason [the lack of a Retina screen] in particular - but it's damn close to my ideal device. In my review of the Nexus 7 (which I really liked, to the shock of many), I kept coming back to one thing: the form-factor. Mix this with iOS and Apple's app ecosystem and the intangibles I spoke about earlier and the iPad mini is an explosion of handheld joy

...But how will a $329 tablet fare in a world of $199 tablets? It's hard to know for sure, but my guess would be in the range of "quite well" to "spectacular."

Walt Mossberg for The Wall Street Journal/All Things D:

In shrinking the iconic iPad, Apple has pulled off an impressive feat. It has managed to create a tablet that's notably thinner and lighter than the leading small competitors with 7-inch screens, while squeezing in a significantly roomier 7.9-inch display. And it has shunned the plastic construction used in its smaller rivals to retain the iPad's sturdier aluminum and glass body.

...I've been testing the iPad mini for several days and found it does exactly what it promises: It brings the iPad experience to a smaller device. Every app that ran on my larger iPad ran perfectly on the mini. I was able to use it one-handed and hold it for long periods of time without tiring. My only complaints were that it's a tad too wide to fit in most of my pockets, and the screen resolution is a big step backwards from the Retina display on the current large iPad.

John Gruber at Daring Fireball:

If the Mini had a Retina display, I'd switch from the iPad 3 in a heartbeat. As it stands, I'm going to switch anyway. Going non-Retina is a particularly bitter pill for me, but I like the iPad mini's size and weight so much that I'm going to swallow it.

My guess is that this is going to play out much like the iPod and iPod mini back in 2004: the full-size model will continue to sell strongly, but the mini is going to become the bestselling model.

Ed Baig for USA Today:

The smaller form changes the way you approach the tablet. I've never hesitated to travel with the bigger iPad. It's terrific for reading, watching movies and playing games on an airplane - but given a choice, before a road trip I would now more likely grab the little guy. It's the right size for immersing yourself in a novel. Held sideways, it's simple to bang out an email with your fingers. ... Despite a few quibbles and strong competitors in the space, the Mini is a splendid choice for folks who held off buying an iPad because it was too large or too expensive.

Scott Stein of CNET:

If the iPad Mini had a Retina display, a newer A6 processor, and a slightly lower price, it would be the must-have Apple gadget of the year. Even without that, it's still incredibly appealing.

...I'm not sure who the iPad mini is for. The budget-minded, perhaps, or kids, or those who want a second iPad. Businesses that want a more portable onsite iPad. People who want to mount an iPad in their vehicles. Actually, I guess I know exactly who the iPad mini is for. With iOS having such reach, this is another use case, another form. It's as simple as that. The iPad mini probably isn't for everyone, and that's exactly the point. Like the iPod and Nano, it's another style for another crowd. I will say this: when you see it, you'll desire it. Just remind yourself you may not need it.

Harry McCracken of TIME:

Aesthetically, the 7-inchers are all nice considering their price. The mini is nice, period. It's glass on the front and aluminum on the back, and at least as deluxe-feeling as any other iPad Apple has ever made. But the company didn't quite stick an iPad in a photocopier and press the Reduce button.

...If your budget's got more wiggle room, the iPad mini is the best compact-sized tablet on the market. Apple didn't build yet another bargain-basement special; it squeezed all of the big iPad's industrial-design panache, software polish and third-party apps, and most of its technology, into a smaller thinner, lighter, lower-priced model. The result may be a product in a category of one - but I have a hunch it's going to be an awfully popular category.

Clayton Morris for Fox News:

It's just a runty iPad, but the new iPad mini somehow manages to establish its very own identity. ... With stellar hardware and hundreds of thousands of apps, the iPad is the Kleenex of facial tissue. The Tivo of DVRs. It has all the perks of using an iOS device: AppStore, iMessages, FaceTime, etc.

Bloomberg's Rich Jaroslovsky:

Apple's most important products created their own markets: People didn't know they wanted or needed an iPhone until Steve Jobs & Co. showed it to them. The iPad mini, by contrast, is an attempt to follow competitors rather than find a new audience. Amazon.com's Kindle Fire and Google's Nexus 7, to name two, have shown that users want something smaller than the 9.7-inch screen that's been on every iPad until now.

Which isn't to say Apple has compromised the iPad experience. For the most part, it has simply shrunk it....

Which raises the question: How much is Apple's superiority in software and content worth to you? How about $130?... I can tell you the iPad mini is the best small tablet you can buy. The question you'll have to answer for yourself is whether it's that much better.
... The iPad mini is a product that's resolutely "Apple": it distills the essentials of the 9.7-inch iPad - iOS app compatibility, multimedia functionality, premium build quality, and comprehensive connectivity - without diluting them to unnecessarily meet a budget price point the company has no real interest in achieving. ...
... What it also means is that the iPad mini isn't the iPad you buy simply because you can't necessarily afford the larger iPad with Retina display. There are legitimate arguments for the smaller model, not undermined by flimsy construction or compromised capabilities.
... In the end, it's about an overall package, an experience which Apple is offering. Not the fastest tablet, nor the cheapest, nor the one that prioritizes the most pixel-dense display, but the one with the lion's share of tablet applications, the integration with the iOS/iTunes ecosystem, the familiarity of usability and, yes, the brand cachet. That's a compelling metric by which to judge a new product, and it's a set of abilities that single the iPad mini out in the marketplace. If the iPad with Retina display is the flagship of Apple's tablet range, then the iPad mini is the everyman model, and it's one that will deservedly sell very well.

TUAW - The Unofficial Apple WeblogiPad mini reviews roundup (updated) originally appeared on TUAW - The Unofficial Apple Weblog on Wed, 31 Oct 2012 01:00:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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30Oct/12Off

iPad mini reviews roundup

The rest of us will have to wait until Friday, but a few lucky reviewers have already gotten their hands on the iPad mini to give it a test run. Here's what journalists and tech bloggers have to saw about the svelte mini:

Jim Dalrymple at The Loop:

I was wrong. I have wondered publicly whether or not a smaller tablet would fit into my workflow and even suggested the larger iPad would be better. I was wrong...

I went to a local big box retailer and used every tablet they had in the store, including Microsoft's new Surface. The difference was immediately clear. The quality of these other tablets is so inferior to what Apple manufactures that they felt like plastic toys in your hands...

I am a firm believer in "you get what you pay for." The iPad mini is a perfect example of that. If you want to save $50 and buy a cheap-ass tablet, go ahead. If you want quality the iPad mini will be waiting for you when you come to your senses.

Tim Stevens for Engadget:

This isn't just an Apple tablet made to a budget. This isn't just a shrunken-down iPad. This is, in many ways, Apple's best tablet yet, an incredibly thin, remarkably light, obviously well-constructed device that offers phenomenal battery life. No, the performance doesn't match Apple's latest and yes, that display is a little lacking in resolution, but nothing else here will leave you wanting. At $329, this has a lot to offer over even Apple's more expensive tablets.

Joshua Topolsky for The Verge:

The iPad mini is an excellent tablet - but it's not a very cheap one. Whether that's by design, or due to market forces beyond Apple's control, I can't say for sure. I can't think of another company that cares as much about how its products are designed and built - or one that knows how to maximize a supply chain as skillfully - so something tells me it's no accident that this tablet isn't selling for $200. It doesn't feel like Apple is racing to some lowest-price bottom - rather it seems to be trying to raise the floor.

...And it does raise the floor here. There's no tablet in this size range that's as beautifully constructed, works as flawlessly, or has such an incredible software selection. Would I prefer a higher-res display? Certainly. Would I trade it for the app selection or hardware design? For the consistency and smoothness of its software, or reliability of its battery? Absolutely not. And as someone who's been living with (and loving) Google's Nexus 7 tablet for a few months, I don't say that lightly.

David Pogue for The New York Times:

Over all, the mini gives you all the iPad goodness in a more manageable size, and it's awesome. You could argue that the iPad mini is what the iPad always wanted to be.

MG Siegler of TechCrunch:

The iPad mini isn't perfect - for one reason [the lack of a Retina screen] in particular - but it's damn close to my ideal device. In my review of the Nexus 7 (which I really liked, to the shock of many), I kept coming back to one thing: the form-factor. Mix this with iOS and Apple's app ecosystem and the intangibles I spoke about earlier and the iPad mini is an explosion of handheld joy

...But how will a $329 tablet fare in a world of $199 tablets? It's hard to know for sure, but my guess would be in the range of "quite well" to "spectacular."

Walt Mossberg for The Wall Street Journal/All Things D:

In shrinking the iconic iPad, Apple has pulled off an impressive feat. It has managed to create a tablet that's notably thinner and lighter than the leading small competitors with 7-inch screens, while squeezing in a significantly roomier 7.9-inch display. And it has shunned the plastic construction used in its smaller rivals to retain the iPad's sturdier aluminum and glass body.

...I've been testing the iPad mini for several days and found it does exactly what it promises: It brings the iPad experience to a smaller device. Every app that ran on my larger iPad ran perfectly on the mini. I was able to use it one-handed and hold it for long periods of time without tiring. My only complaints were that it's a tad too wide to fit in most of my pockets, and the screen resolution is a big step backwards from the Retina display on the current large iPad.

John Gruber at Daring Fireball:

If the Mini had a Retina display, I'd switch from the iPad 3 in a heartbeat. As it stands, I'm going to switch anyway. Going non-Retina is a particularly bitter pill for me, but I like the iPad mini's size and weight so much that I'm going to swallow it.

My guess is that this is going to play out much like the iPod and iPod mini back in 2004: the full-size model will continue to sell strongly, but the mini is going to become the bestselling model.

Ed Baig for USA Today:

The smaller form changes the way you approach the tablet. I've never hesitated to travel with the bigger iPad. It's terrific for reading, watching movies and playing games on an airplane - but given a choice, before a road trip I would now more likely grab the little guy. It's the right size for immersing yourself in a novel. Held sideways, it's simple to bang out an email with your fingers. ... Despite a few quibbles and strong competitors in the space, the Mini is a splendid choice for folks who held off buying an iPad because it was too large or too expensive.

Scott Stein of CNET:

If the iPad Mini had a Retina display, a newer A6 processor, and a slightly lower price, it would be the must-have Apple gadget of the year. Even without that, it's still incredibly appealing.

...I'm not sure who the iPad mini is for. The budget-minded, perhaps, or kids, or those who want a second iPad. Businesses that want a more portable onsite iPad. People who want to mount an iPad in their vehicles. Actually, I guess I know exactly who the iPad mini is for. With iOS having such reach, this is another use case, another form. It's as simple as that. The iPad mini probably isn't for everyone, and that's exactly the point. Like the iPod and Nano, it's another style for another crowd. I will say this: when you see it, you'll desire it. Just remind yourself you may not need it.

Harry McCracken of TIME:

Aesthetically, the 7-inchers are all nice considering their price. The mini is nice, period. It's glass on the front and aluminum on the back, and at least as deluxe-feeling as any other iPad Apple has ever made. But the company didn't quite stick an iPad in a photocopier and press the Reduce button.

...If your budget's got more wiggle room, the iPad mini is the best compact-sized tablet on the market. Apple didn't build yet another bargain-basement special; it squeezed all of the big iPad's industrial-design panache, software polish and third-party apps, and most of its technology, into a smaller thinner, lighter, lower-priced model. The result may be a product in a category of one - but I have a hunch it's going to be an awfully popular category.

Clayton Morris for Fox News:

It's just a runty iPad, but the new iPad mini somehow manages to establish its very own identity. ... With stellar hardware and hundreds of thousands of apps, the iPad is the Kleenex of facial tissue. The Tivo of DVRs. It has all the perks of using an iOS device: AppStore, iMessages, FaceTime, etc.

Bloomberg's Rich Jaroslovsky:

Apple's most important products created their own markets: People didn't know they wanted or needed an iPhone until Steve Jobs & Co. showed it to them. The iPad mini, by contrast, is an attempt to follow competitors rather than find a new audience. Amazon.com's Kindle Fire and Google's Nexus 7, to name two, have shown that users want something smaller than the 9.7-inch screen that's been on every iPad until now.

Which isn't to say Apple has compromised the iPad experience. For the most part, it has simply shrunk it....

Which raises the question: How much is Apple's superiority in software and content worth to you? How about $130?... I can tell you the iPad mini is the best small tablet you can buy. The question you'll have to answer for yourself is whether it's that much better.

TUAW - The Unofficial Apple WeblogiPad mini reviews roundup originally appeared on TUAW - The Unofficial Apple Weblog on Wed, 31 Oct 2012 01:00:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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